Anacortes Community Forest Lands (ACFL) Forest Monitoring

Year-end Get Together: Saturday, November 7, 2019, 7 pm (doors open at 6:30)

Anacortes Community Forest Lands (ACFL)
Forest Monitoring

Contact us at info@transitionfidalgo.org to be involved with this new and exciting Citizen Science opportunity. We have nearly finished our first summer of studies. Now we are preparing for our fall studies and next year’s program to carry on.

The Anacortes Community Forest Lands (ACFL) are a defining feature of our community and key to our sense of place.

The ACFL is changing, as it has from its very beginning. Now, though, it faces a climate that has started changing at rates that will become faster than ecosystems, or humans, have ever experienced.

Transition Fidalgo & Friends is sponsoring a citizen science project to monitor change in the ACFL. We have three objectives: (1) to get to know our forest better (we care for things that we know more intimately); (2) to document current conditions and then to track how the forest is responding and changing; and (3) to make that data available to researchers and land managers, so that we learn how forests respond and if/how we can help them adapt more successfully.

Climate change is a global challenge unfolding over many decades. Its vast scale across both space and time can make it difficult to understand or observe. By studying our local forest, we can make both the challenges and the solutions to climate change a tangible reality for our community. 

This is a volunteer-led project, guided by an advisory board that includes experts in forest ecology, resource management, and the administration of volunteer programs. We’ll need many volunteers to ensure success. And not just people who want to study the forest, but also those interested in data entry, education, recording people’s stories, writing articles about forest critters, organizing and contacting volunteers, and many other tasks.

We’ll also need donations to make this work. While this is a volunteer-led project, the management of a swarm of volunteers and a blizzard of data takes dedicated time from a part-time paid volunteer manager. We’re exploring different scenarios, but all will involve some cost. We hope that community members who value the ACFL will support this program both as volunteers and as donors.

Jack Hartt is our part-time volunteer coordinator and project liaison.  You can contact him directly at skagitjack@outlook.com

This fall, we will have a second round of trailside cedar monitoring studies, photos taken in the 2016 burn area, and hopefully the beginning of a phenology study and a hydrology study.